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Keep Your RV Mouse-Free This Season

One of the main reasons we take to the great outdoors in our RVs and travel trailers is to get closer to nature. Visiting our great country’s national parks and monuments as well as the smaller, local treasures is why most people start RVing. We enjoy seeing wildlife and animals out in their natural habitat and like seeing how they live. What we aren’t too excited about is their habit of coming up close and personal to view our living quarters. It is not a lot of fun to wake up to mice having a midnight snack on the counter. We want our RV mouse-free, thank you very much.

Hungry Mouse by Alexas Photos for NextRV.co Keep Your RV Mouse-Free This Season
Hungry Mouse by Alexas Photos

Why Mice Want To Visit You

Regardless of what type of camping you’re doing, mice are the most common campground pest out there. A cabin, tent or RV are all fair game when it comes to these nosy and always hungry critters. The smells of tasty food and the possibility of a warm and cozy place to house their little (and always growing) family draw them in.

How They Get In

Mice aren’t the tiniest pests you have trying to invade your space, they’re just the most prolific. They can’t come in under doors or up through the kitchen drain, but they can find a way. For the most part, if a mouse can get its head into an opening, they’re IN! If the hole is roughly the size of a dime or bigger, they can squeeze all the way through.

How To Keep Them Out

There are several ways in which you can keep your rig from turning into a mouse motel. You may end up using more than one of these methods but the end result is worth it — no more mice!

Entry Denied!

The first and easiest method is to block or take away any of their points of entry. By making sure your doors and windows are kept closed, you will go a long way in denying the mice entry.

Installing screens on all doors and windows is the next step. Using a spray foam insulation can help seal up any cracks or openings around the windows or other possible points of entry. This may include seams created when your rig was built. Or the corners where floor and wall meet and other areas such as those where cabinets are attached to the frame.

Keep It Clean

Keeping your rig clean is a major help with deterring pests. Make sure that all food is put away in airtight containers or cabinets. If the rodents can’t smell or see the food, they won’t be coming in after it. Be sure to wipe down all counters and tables after any meal or snack. Even the smallest crumb will get their attention. It’s a good idea to sweep up at least once a day if not more.

The Power Of Smell

Mice are known to have sensitive noses. While it is helpful for them in sniffing out little tidbits of food and goodies, it can work against them. They don’t do well with very strong scents.

Essential Oils To The Rescue

A natural way to repel mice is to use essential oils. These strong and concentrated oils are easy to find and even easier to use. Add several drops of cayenne pepper, cloves or peppermint oil onto some cotton balls. Place these balls in your cupboards or near possible entry points. The heavy scent will make the mice think twice before letting themselves into your rig. CAUTION: Be careful if you have cats or dogs when you’re using essential oils. The oils can be hazardous or even deadly to them. Keep them up and away from their prying paws and noses.

Too Late!

If you do get a mouse or two (or more) in your RV or trailer, it’s not too late. There are many traps and other ways to catch them. You can choose one of the old standbys that you bait with cheese or peanut butter. That tell-tale SNAP! lets you know when you’ve been successful. Or you can try some of the newer humane traps for catch and release or even the electrical traps that kill them instantly with a ZAP!

As with most things, planning ahead and preparing for the worst will get you the best results. So start closing up the welcome wagon now and you’ll have your RV mouse-free in no time.

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